These summaries were prepared by McGuireWoods LLP lawyer Thomas E. Spahn. They are based on the letter opinions issued by the Virginia State Bar. Any editorial comments reflect Mr. Spahn's current personal views, and not the opinions of the Virginia State Bar, McGuireWoods or its clients. 
 
 Back to main menu
  Topic: 49 - Lawyers - Miscellaneous
LEO NumTopicsSummaryDate
1869

printPrint
18-Consent and Prospective Waivers

28-Law Firm Staff

46-Confidentiality - Miscellaneous

49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

A family court self-help center facilitator (a lawyer or a paralegal trained in family law who volunteers to assist unrepresented customers) does not establish an attorney-client relationship with such customers, if the Customer Agreement "has the pro se litigant understand and acknowledge that the limited assistance provided by the Facilitator does not create a lawyer-client relationship, that no legal advice is given, that information will not be kept confidential and that the Facilitator may provide assistance to adverse litigants." (footnote omitted). A lawyer merely providing legal information and not legal services does not fall under Rule 6.5's provision governing "short-term limited legal services." "Merely providing sample pleadings or forms to a pro se litigant is not the practice of law; however, the completion of a form pleading or legal document for the pro se litigant would be." (footnote omitted). Rule 6.5 does not address conflicts arising after a lawyer provides such a limited representation, so the lawyer may be precluded from other representations adverse to the client the lawyer had assisted. Paralegals may not engage in the "unsupervised preparation of pleadings or other legal documents," so lawyers may not train paralegals to provide such unsupervised services. Various resources can help lawyers distinguish between providing "legal information" and "legal advice." [Approved by the Supreme Court of Virginia 11/2/16].5/28/2013
1412

printPrint
34-Limiting Liability to Clients

49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

A solo practitioner's research and preparation of briefs and other pleadings constitutes the practice of law, which prevents the lawyer from limiting the lawyer's professional liability (regardless of the lawyer's attempt to contractually define the services as not amounting to legal services). 6/12/1991
0596

printPrint
49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

Law students practicing in their third year of law school should be considered lawyers for conflicts of interest purposes. [Law students may no longer practice law.]8/10/1984
1392

printPrint
32-Lawyers Acting in Other Roles (Miscellaneous)

49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

54-Insurance Defense Lawyers

Plaintiff or defense lawyers may serve on Medical Malpractice Review Panels as long as they are not representing the claimant or the defendant, or are otherwise involved in actual facts before the panel. 1/14/1991
ABA-469

printPrint
27-Litigation Tactics (Including Misrepresentations, Tape Recordings)

49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

51-Government Attorneys

Prosecutors who allow private debt collection companies to use their stationery to explicitly or implicitly threaten prosecution of delinquent debtors violate: (1) ABA Model Rule 8.4(c)'s anti-deception provision; (2) ABA Model Rule 5.5(a)'s prohibition on assisting nonlawyer's unauthorized practice of law, because such conduct necessarily involves nonlawyers analyzing whether a crime has been committed and a prosecution would be justified.11/12/2014
ABA-356

printPrint
45-Law Firms - Miscellaneous

49-Lawyers - Miscellaneous

Temporary lawyers must comply with all ethics rules arising from a lawyer's representation of a client, but depending on the facts (such as whether the temporary lawyer "has access to information relating to the representation of firm clients other than the clients on whose matters the lawyer is working") may not be considered "associated" with law firms for purposes of the imputed disqualification rules (the firm should screen such temporary lawyers from other representations). Lawyers hiring temporary lawyers to perform "independent work for a client without the close supervision of a lawyer associated with the law firm" must obtain the client's consent after full disclosure. Lawyers need not obtain the client's consent to having temporary lawyers working on the client matters if the temporary lawyers are "working under the direct supervision of a lawyer associated with the firm." Lawyers need not advise clients of the compensation arrangement for temporary lawyers "assuming that a law firm simply pays the temporary lawyer reasonable compensation for the services performed for the firm and does not charge the payments thereafter to the client as a disbursement."12/16/1988

Copyright 2000, Thomas E. Spahn